Tuesday, December 4, 2012

Scrambling to Keep Up

This morning's Boston Globe has a front page article discussing the shortage of technology-savvy job candidates for hundreds of open positions.

Titled "Boston-area Tech is Scrambling to Fill Jobs", here's how the piece starts:

As he does most mornings, headhunter David Freier began a recent workday by hitting the phones. His target this day: finding a software ­engineer for a growing start-up in Cambridge. By the afternoon, he had dialed about 150 numbers and had mostly gotten voice mailboxes, or people who just hung up on him. In the end, he had scrounged up just four qualified — and willing — candidates. “We have to make approximately 300 percent more calls to fill one position than we did three years ago,” said Freier, who founded ICI Software Recruitment in the early days of the 1990s Internet …

http://www.bostonglobe.com/business/2012/12/04/boston-area-tech-recruiters-battle-for-talent/IICvqL32d5ZRINB8Gp0LpJ/story.html

Meanwhile, in another part of this morning's paper, the Globe reports that both Bank of America and Pfizer are planning layoffs.

The pace of change in the economic landscape has been enormous, and companies are scrambling to keep up.  Good-paying jobs in areas like finance and pharmaceuticals are disappearing as businesses use new channels to market their products.  Meanwhile, the skills to thrive in an area rich with new technology are scarce.

Put another way:  Just yesterday, both President Obama and the Pope were on Twitter.Who would have thought it?

Keeping up with the changes is very challenging, so I thought this presentation was very useful.

Mary Meeker has been one of the top technology analysts on Wall Street for many years. Today she is employed by venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caulfiedl & Byers (KPCB)  Every year she gives a presentation on the "state of the internet" that is always interesting and informative.  I thought this year's talk was particularly good.

Here are her slides, courtesy of the blog Business Insider: